COVID19

Publications

State of Working Georgia: Pandemic Job Numbers are Improving, but Inequitably

Key Takeaways:

  • Nearly 60 percent of Georgia’s pre-pandemic labor force have turned to the unemployment safety net at some point during the last year.
  • In February 2021, unemployment claims for Black Georgians were 52 percent higher than those of all other filers, and 71 percent higher than those of white Georgians alone.
  • Hispanic and Black women have experienced at least 15 percent underemployment since the pandemic, while underemployment for Black men was 18 percent in the first quarter of 2021, more than any other group in Georgia’s workforce.

Recent historic federal stimulus packages have extended critical unemployment safety net programs, provided immediate cash aid to millions of employed and unemployed Georgians and provided state and local funding to jumpstart Georgia’s recovery. As a result, state lawmakers have an opportunity to target federal and state funding to rebuild Georgia’s economy through racial and gender equity-centered solutions that can support economic mobility for all Georgians. However, more than a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, data shows how some Georgians are beginning to recover, while others have experienced little to no recovery at all.

Domestic Workers are Essential Workers: By the Numbers in New York

Throughout the coronavirus crisis, domestic workers have been placed under double pressure. Already underpaid, many domestic workers have lost their jobs, or lost hours on the job, putting them under added financial stress. Even when on the job, however, domestic workers find themselves under added physical and psychological stress, acting as essential workers during a pandemic at some risk to their own health as they protect the health of others. Domestic workers include house cleaners, nannies, and home care aides who care for people with disabilities or who are elderly or infirm.

The COVID-19 Crisis After One Year: Economic Impacts and Challenges Facing Granite Staters

In the year since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Hampshire, hardships facing Granite Staters have been caused by both public health risks as well as the economic crisis spurred by sudden shifts in the labor market and available jobs. While many of the most severe effects of the COVID-19 crisis have subsided, levels and the composition of employment have not yet returned to the pre-pandemic status. Additionally, many of those most impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 crisis may have been among the least prepared to weather the economic shock due to the uneven nature of the recovery from the last recession.